dog in circle

 

English Staffordshire Bull Terrier

(Staffy)

"Bailey"

Staffy profile

Exercise:stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon
Playfulness:
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Friendliness with dogs:
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Friendliness with people:stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon
Ease of training:stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon
Grooming effort:stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon
Affection:stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon stats-icon

Lifespan:  12-14 Years

Avg height:  35-48cm

Avg weight:  13.5-18 kg

Coat type:  Short, smooth coat

Coat colours:  Red, fawn, white, black, blue or brindle. Solid colours or with white. 

Originally bred for:  Historical sport fighting (now illegal)

Breed traits: Intelligent, affectionate, loyal, dependable, brave

 

A little about the English Staffordshire Bull Terrier (Staffy)

 

Staffies are a loyal and brave breed renowned for their overly affectionate and loving personality. Informally known as the smiling dog, Staffies are incredibly loyal to their owners and prefer people over other dogs. 

 

 

ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER (STAFFY)

HEALTH INFORMATION

Staffies are generally a healthy breed. The genetic health concerns include hip and elbow dysplasia, patella luxation and juvenile cataracts. They do commonly experience anxiety issues and staffies also suffer from a fairly high rate of allergies that can cause skin itching and secondary infections.

 
 

A day in the life of "Bailey"


 
I look up at my human and huff. Still no head rubs. I’ve pulled all my best moves; grumbles, foot licks and even head tilts. Nothing. Is it really that hard to get a pat?

My owners ignored me for ten minutes. Ten minutes! The audacity. It’s not like I’m asking for much, just a bit of attention!

I huff and grumble once more, then finish off with a long ‘awoooowowoowoo,’ but still nothing. Time to up my game. I stand up and trot five metres away and retrieve my ball. The human always loves this.

I start to run, always to the right and always passing the flower bush and the water bowl before looping back to face my human. Two barks, then I repeat my loop, all holding my ball tightly.

‘Bailey, shush!’ Not the attention I wanted. I’ve completed six loops. Six! It would normally only take four. I trot closer to my human and rest my head on their leg. They’re still deeply engaged in conversation with the stranger. I get nothing.

‘Arougggh’ I grumble, loudly. Finally, my owner stands, beckoning me to follow as they walk towards the house. I gallop to catch up, tongue wagging as I do.

‘Get inside.’ I obey, and immediately the door closes. Oh no. I begin to whinge and wine and watch my owner walk back to their seat. After a few minutes, I give up and lie down quietly. Then, can it be? My human has stood back up! They’re walking this way!

‘Come on then Bailey,’ my owner says, and I waddle excitedly, wagging my tail and groaning as I leap back outside and join my human. Finally! Their hand rubs my head.  


Please be advised the information provided is purely an indicator of breed traits and characteristics and that within some breeds there can be significant variation.